vaping lung damage

The growing trend of vaping and e-cigs has moved its way into the lives of millennials and young teens, using them as genuine pigs. However, now after several cases of lung damage, lung failures and more they now announce, ” Vaping one time, even without nicotine can cause damage to the blood vessels, reduce blood flow and create dangerous and deadly toxins.

According to a new study published in the journal Radiology, claims that the heat created when e-cigarettes turn liquid into vapors mixes the compounds into toxics particles, which causes damages to blood vessels. The study, which was conducted at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, took an MRI of 31 healthy non-smokers before and after vaping nicotine-free e-cigarettes. The participants took three second drags 16 times on the e-cigs that had tobacco flavoring and sweeteners, but no nicotine. After each finished, the team analyzed the data and found that blood flow decreased in the femoral artery, the main artery that delivers blood to the thigh and leg.

Also, they also noticed that the participants had worse circulation, stiffer arteries, and less oxygen in their bloodstream. Felix Wehrli, the study’s principal investigator, explained in an interview that,

“The results of our study defeat the notion that e-cigarette vaping is harmless.”

“Beyond the harmful effects of nicotine, we’ve shown that vaping has a sudden, immediate effect on the body’s vascular function, and could potentially lead to long-term harmful consequences,” he added in a statement published by the University of Pennsylvania.

These findings reflect the same process in the initial steps leading to cardiovascular disease. However, it would take many years to develop.

The team concluded that they saw an average 34 percent reduction in the femoral artery’s dilation. They also noted that vaping led to a 17.5 percent reduction in peak blood flow, and a 30 percent decrease in oxygen found in the veins.

The study’s lead author, Alessandra Caporale, highlighted in a statement that these discoveries show that vaping can cause significant changes to the inner wall of blood vessels.

“E-cigarettes are advertised as not harmful, and many e-cigarette users are convinced that they are just inhaling water vapor,” Caporale stated in an interview. “But the solvents, flavorings, and additives in the liquid base, after vaporization, expose users to multiple insults to the respiratory tract and blood vessels.”

The once-popular notation that e-cigarettes do not harm the human body has now faced public and scientifically proven backlash. In just the last month, almost 100 teens in 14 states have reported lung damage after vaping. This included 14 hospitalizations in two states at the beginning of August 2019.

After such a mass amount reports, the  Centers for Disease Control announced it would start an investigation into the health consequences of smoking e-cigarettes. An earlier study discovered that e-cigarette flavors, or juice, had toxic effects, including more delicate cell survival and increased inflammation.

“Inhaling chemicals into your lungs is dangerous,” announced Erika Sward, a spokesperson for the American Lung Association. She added, “E-cigarettes are guilty until proven innocent, and we are very much in the guilty stage.”

“Nobody knows what it does to the human lung to breathe in and out aerosolized propylene glycol and glycerin over and over. It’s an experiment, frankly,” said Dr. Robert Jackler, founder of Stanford Research Into the Impact of Tobacco Advertising, during a congressional hearing in July. “We will find out, years from now, the results,” he concluded his announcement.

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